Penwith Press Cornwall

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Dowsing

Hamish Miller DowsingWhy does this place feel so special?  If I dig here, will I hit the water main? Should I really be eating this?

Dowsing, also known as divining, is a way of finding out about things beyond the range of our five senses. “A technique for bringing information from the intuitive or subconscious senses to the attention of the rational mind, it has potential value in almost every area of human endeavour, research and activity, and dowsing practitioners find it a valuable tool in both their work and their everyday lives”. (www.britishdowsers.org)

Dowsing has many uses: finding concealed or lost objects; archaeological surveys; assessing health and well-being: analysing and working with the subtle earth energies which flow around the planet and of course, finding water.  There is an increasing need for reliable sources of drinking water, as well as new sources of oil and minerals, particularly in less-developed areas.

Although requiring careful and responsible training, with plenty of practice, everybody has the ability to dowse.  Whether dowsing with rods, pendulum or a stone on a piece of string, you are the dowser, diviner or geomancer. The tools are just the 'needle on the dial'.

The British Society of Dowsers has developed a training programme for tutors and a tried and tested curriculum for dowsing courses, now run throughout the UK by the Society's registered tutors.  Through the year, BSD tutor John Moss runs 1-day workshops in Cornwall, as well as 2-day courses in Devon, Somerset and Gloucestershire.  See: www.dowsingplace.co.uk


Dowsing can open doorways to wider perceptions. Once you start dowsing, you will never look at the world around you in the same way again.  It's time to explore this ancient, yet timeless skill.